Do you get stomach pain and bloating? Gassy foods are the biggest culprit of stomach pain and bloating but there may be something else causing your tummy pain and bloating...Mother Nature.

Medlineplus.com defines abdominal bloating as "a condition in which the belly (abdomen) feels full and tight".

There are obvious causes of stomach pain and bloating. Overeating, spicy foods, medicines, caffeine, dehydration, menstrual cycles, eating or drinking too fast, etc. These can all contribute to stomach pain and bloating but something a bit less obvious can also cause abdominal discomfort...the The weather. Changes in the weather can also cause abdominal pain and swelling, especially quick changes.

Have you ever noticed your stomach becoming tight before or after a thunderstorm or on a really hot day? For the first time in history, a new study confirms that changes in barometric pressure and high temperatures can cause your stomach to hurt. Your stomach may be able to predict the forecast before your local meteorologist can.

As storms move through an area, the barometric pressure may drop or rise. You may have noticed your tires on your car needing air after a storm or a leftover balloon from a birthday party may fall to the ground or go up toward the ceiling. All caused by changes in the barometric pressure. Your stomach is very much like your tires and that birthday balloon.

Hot weather will also cause stomach discomfort. Swiss researchers found during hot weather, 'there is an increased risk of infectious gastroenteritis".

Researchers have only recently linked abdominal pain to weather conditions. Change in barometric pressure and temperature can cause the following:

  • pain
  • excessive gas (flatulence)
  • frequent burping or belching
  • abdominal rumbling or gurgles
  • Digestion disorders

Heathline.com suggests avoiding chewing gum, limit your intake of carbonated drinks, avoid foods that cause gas, eat slowly, don't drink using a straw and use lactose-free dairy products. Probiotics may also help, consult your doctor.

[Via express.co.uk, livescience.com, everydayhealth.com and healthline.com]