How wrong does a teenager's clothing have to be for a New Orleans restaurant to call the cops? New Orleans, a city where women lift their tops to be thrown plastic beads that will have zero relevance to them once they return home from Mardi Gras. The mother of the 17-year-old is not happy with a New Orleans restaurant and is suing the restaurant where her teenage daughter held her graduation party.

Sanai Butler was celebrating her graduation with family and friends at Lula Restaurant Distillery in New Orleans. The teen had just graduated from Warren Easton Charter School and was dressed to the nines for her celebration.

The restaurant called NOPD on Butler because they didn't approve of her top. According to NOLA.com, the event was so traumatic for the 17-year-old, that she has had to start seeing a clinical psychologist for emotional distress.

The girl's mom alleges that the restaurant intentionally inflicted emotional distress on her and her 17-year-old daughter by attempting to (weaponize) the NOPD simply because one of the establishment's c0-owners didn't like the teen's top. -NOLA.com

The Butler's are now taking Lulu Restaurant Distillery, located at 1532 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, to court claiming emotional distress.

The Butler's group consisted of 28 people all at the restaurant for Sanai's graduation party. The 17-year-old had graduated with honors from Warren Easton Charter School. She and her family had planned on having a wonderful time with friends and family and were going to announce to everyone that Sanai would be attending Talladega College in Alabama.

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