Have you ever asked a man a question and have him not react as though he never heard you? Or gave him specific instructions only to find out he didn't listen to a word you said? What happens to men? Are they asleep with their eyes open? How can men be so oblivious to some things? Why do they leave out almost every detail when telling a story? How can men simply not care about stuff? It's all because of the neck up.

There has never been a scientific study or anything written in the Journal of Medicine that has explained the differences between a male brain and a female brain better than Mark Gungor, one of the world's most sought-after speakers on marriage and relationships.

Gungor addresses marriage and the differences between men and women during his presentations, in a down-to-earth comedic way that will have you laughing and learning at the same time.

For over a decade, Mark’s materials have been the #1 resources for improving relationships used by the US Military. -Celebration Church

Gungor has been featured on national broadcasts and in major publications. For anyone wanting to better understand the relationship between men and women, the video below is a must-see.

In the "Tale of Two Brains," session Gungor talks about how men's brains are made up of a bunch of boxes. One of those boxes is the "nothing box". A man will rush to his "nothing box" every time he gets a chance. That's why a man can zone out whereas a woman can't. A woman's brain does not have a "nothing box".

Mark's message is funny, yet, very powerful. He ends the "Tale of Two Brains," with a profound message to men.

Don't forget about her. don't neglect her. Do what you need to do but make sure you go back for the girl. -Mark Gungor

 

"Tale of 2 brains" (The abbreviated TikTok video that's currently circulating)

"Tale of Two Brains" (Full version)

LOOK: Milestones in women's history from the year you were born

Women have left marks on everything from entertainment and music to space exploration, athletics, and technology. Each passing year and new milestone makes it clear both how recent this history-making is in relation to the rest of the country, as well as how far we still need to go. The resulting timeline shows that women are constantly making history worthy of best-selling biographies and classroom textbooks; someone just needs to write about them.

Scroll through to find out when women in the U.S. and around the world won rights, the names of women who shattered the glass ceiling, and which country's women banded together to end a civil war.