It's not just what you say in court that helps you to win or lose a case, it could also be what you wear. Before your big day in court, layout a winning outfit.

The judge will be doing just that...judging. The jury will be doing the same. Your style and color of clothing will also be on trial. Before you step into a courtroom, try on these tips.

Court Style Tips for Women

Dress professionally and be conservative. A professional (not sexy) dress is appropriate courtroom attire for a woman. A long skirt, professional blouse, slacks, sweater are all acceptable pieces as well.

Court Style Tips for Men

Look together and professional. A suit is the best attire for a male attempting to sway a judge and jury. If not a suit, a long-sleeved dress shirt, pressed slacks and a dark blazer is the next best outfit.

A watch and wedding ring are acceptable. External jewelry associated with piercings should be removed. Tattoos should be covered. Men should be clean-shaven and hair (only natural colors) should be short. Be careful to not go overboard with the cologne.

Colors That Win

Never wear black. Many people think black is a great color to wear into court, don't do it. Black is perfect for a funeral, wearing black into a courtroom could bury your case. Choose navy or gray instead. Black clothing may associate you with evil and darkness. Black clothing may also make you come off as cold, bitter and controlling.

The objective is to look serious. Be conservative, professional and avoid distracting patterns. Be traditional.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

These Articles of Clothing Should Never be Worn to Court

  •    Jeans
  •    Shorts
  •    Short skirts
  •    Sundresses
  •    T-shirts
  •    Sneakers
  •    Flip flops
  •    High heels
  •    Revealing clothes
  •    Tight clothes
  •    Hats
  •    Sunglasses
  •    Dirty, disheveled, or ripped clothing

Remember, going to court is very much like a very important job interview. Don't dress like you're going to the beach.

[Schiller & Hamilton Law Firm]

https://thefw.com/laws-passed-year-you-were-born/