A group of Marine Corps Body Bearers on their way home from a funeral noticed a car stalled out in rising flood waters. What happened next as described in the video is "the most American thing ever".

Marines Push Stalled Car Out Of Rising Floodwaters

Last Thursday (09/16/21) bus carrying a group of Marine Corps Body Bearers who had just finished up their fifth funeral of the day noticed a couple in trouble outside of Arlington National Cemetery.

The area was experiencing major flash flooding as storms moved through. One couple suddenly found themselves in a bad situation as their car stalled out in quickly rising flood waters.

Not being able to start their car to get to safety, they were kind of trapped as they tried to figure out what to do.

That's when the Marines showed up.

TaskandPurpose Via Twitter

 

Much to the stranded couple's surprise "five Marines in their Dress Blue uniforms with the white trousers sometimes worn by those on certain duty assignments during the summer seasonbegan walking towards the stalled car as described by taskandpurpose.com.

One of the Marines asks the woman if the car is in neutral, and upon confirmation, the five men quickly went to work.

As you'll hear the woman say in the video “This is so cool. Oh my God. This is the most American thing ever.”

We couldn't agree more.

TaskandPurpose Via Twitter

 

From taskandpurpose.com -

"Marine Corps Body Bearers are part of a hand-picked unit that perform funeral services at Arlington National Cemetery and elsewhere. They not only render honors for Marines, but they also participate in funerals for presidents and other dignitaries."

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