As South Louisiana hits the peak of hurricane season, there is a concerning disturbance across the central tropical Atlantic.

Ed Roy, former meteorologist for KATC TV in Lafayette and still very respected in the city as a storm tracker, says 96L (Now Tropical Storm Fiona) could be trouble and bears watching.

On the subject of weather....It might be a good idea to start watching what is going on in the tropics. An area in the Atlantic identified as 96L is showing signs of organization and depending on how strong the high-pressure ridge to the north of it is… I think it bears watching. Former KATC Meteorologist Ed Roy

Tropical Storm Fiona is approaching the Caribbean Islands and Puerto Rico and is located approximately 800 miles east of the northeastern Caribbean Islands and showing signs of organization.

Former KATC Meteorologist Ed Roy thinks we should keep an eye on 96L (Now Tropical Storm Fiona)

 

Ed Roy, Facebook
Ed Roy, Facebook
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Ed Roy, Facebook
Ed Roy, Facebook
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Ed Roy, Facebook
Ed Roy, Facebook
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Ed Roy, Facebook
Ed Roy, Facebook
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Ed Roy, Facebook
Ed Roy, Facebook
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The National Hurricane Center puts Tropical Storm Fiona over the northeastern Caribbean Islands, including the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, late Friday or Friday evening.

Latest Information from KATC Chief Meteorologist Rob Perillo.

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