Have you ever looked at your sealed daiquiri cup and asked yourself, 'How is this legal?'

I mean, seriously—it's a styrofoam cup and the only thing that is stopping it from actually being an illegal open container is a piece of scotch tape. On its face, it doesn't seem too be the most convincing representation of a "sealed" container.

Well, there's a story behind it and one woman who deserves all the gratitude. According to this recent post on Lafayette Memories Mrs. Minnie Mikell is behind the genius concept and the tale behind the modern-day daiquiri is an impressive one that dates back to the early 80s.

David Ervin is said to be writing a book on the origins of our storied drive-thru daiquiri shops that are often celebrated by locals and out of towners alike—but there was a time where a drinking and driving controversy related to the drive-thru alcohol concept was making national headlines. Local lawmakers had to do something about it and, at the time, figured they had come up with a pretty solid plan.

As it were, the city of Lafayette was determined to put an end to the unconventional business concept that had been unleashed onto the public. To the total astonishment and anguish of city officials, there were no laws that prohibited the sales of frozen cocktails out of a drive-through window. Lafayette’s council members, after months of deliberations, finally drafted an open container ordinance that would, in their collective judgments, shut the rogue business down for good. Their carefully crafted masterpiece made it illegal to travel the streets of Lafayette with an open alcoholic beverage but failed short of defining what an acceptable sealed container would consist of. A loose layman’s interpretation was that the container had to be sealed at the point of purchase, and once unsealed, could not be resealed.

The entire excerpt from "The Daiquiri Factory" is worth reading, if alone for the simple concept that gave Louisiana one of its most unique characteristics—especially for first-time visitors. I for one will be looking forward to reading Ervin's book if he ever decides to publish it.

So the next time you drive-thru to pick up a gallon or a 20 oz. to-go, think of Mrs. Minnie and give her the respectful nod that she deserves. Maybe even pour out of a little of your daiquiri if you so choose to.

Just don't litter. She didn't come up with a loophole for that one.