Today is the last day anyone will be allowed to smoke at public college campuses in Louisiana.

The state legislature in 2013 passed a law requiring all public institutions of higher education to go smoke-free by Aug. 1, 2014. Many schools have chosen to go tobacco-free, like LSU, according to Vice Chancellor for Student Life Kurt Keppler.

We're not caught up in trying to fine or sanction or punish people. We're trying to get other people to get people to stop.

"Governor Jindal created a Well Spot initiative recently, indicating he wanted all institutions to be considered such a spot go tobacco-free," said Keppler. "So that's what we've decided to do."

Keppler says these tobacco-free policies that campuses are adopting all throughout the state rely on the courtesy, respect and cooperation of all members of the university community.

He says the ultimate goal of implementing the smoke-free policy is to change people's behavior.

"We're not caught up in trying to fine or sanction or punish people," said Keppler. "We're trying to get other people to get people to stop...so we'll be using signage to help with that."

Keppler says these smoke-free policies are becoming a national trend, as colleges want to send the message that smoking cigarettes and chewing tobacco is seen as a habit they're trying to stop.